St. David’s Cathedral – St. David’s, South Wales, Wales

St. David’s Cathedral – St. David’s, South Wales, Wales

Wales’s Greatest Religious Monument People still flock here in the thousands the way they did in the Middle Ages when St. David’s Cathedral was one of the British Isles’ most popular pilgrimage spots. Small by English standards, the medieval cathedral dedicated to Wales’s patron saint is the largest in the country, overwhelming what is officially Britain’s smallest city (the presence of a cathedral designates the village as a city despite its size). St. David founded a monastic community in this coastal comer of south­western Wales around A.D. 550 that grew to great importance. The cathedral, begun in the 12th century, is believed to stand on that site, flanked by the once magnificent Bishop’s Palace; then boasting lavish apartments, it now sits quietly in glorious ruins. Together they constitute Wales’s most sacred site, and one of its most visually evocative—the setting is a remote and tranquil part of the valley of the River Alun barely inland from the coast whose jagged terrain protected it from marauding pirates. A number of ecclesiastical buildings grew up in the shadow of the cen­terpiece cathedral. Dating back to 1860, the Choir School is one of the more recent, and is the site of today’s Warpool Court Hotel, whose manicured lawns lead down to the Irish Sea. It is all part of the 250 miles of unspoiled coastline whose inlets, coves, and huddled bays make up the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, one of three national parks that cover Wales’s most scenic landscape and the only one in Britain to include its balmy coast­line. Its 182 miles of marked serpentine footpaths provide excellent walks in the com­pany of wildflowers and seabirds.

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Wales’s Greatest Religious Monument

People still flock here in the thousands the way they did in the Middle Ages when St. David’s Cathedral was one of the British Isles’ most popular pilgrimage spots. Small by English standards, the medieval cathedral dedicated to Wales’s patron saint is the largest in the country, overwhelming what is officially Britain’s smallest city (the presence of a cathedral designates the village as a city despite its size). St. David founded a monastic community in this coastal comer of south­western Wales around A.D. 550 that grew to great importance.

The cathedral, begun in the 12th century, is believed to stand on that site, flanked by the once magnificent Bishop’s Palace; then boasting lavish apartments, it now sits quietly in glorious ruins. Together they constitute Wales’s most sacred site, and one of its most visually evocative—the setting is a remote and tranquil part of the valley of the River Alun barely inland from the coast whose jagged terrain protected it from marauding pirates. A number of ecclesiastical buildings grew up in the shadow of the cen­terpiece cathedral. Dating back to 1860, the Choir School is one of the more recent, and is the site of today’s Warpool Court Hotel, whose manicured lawns lead down to the Irish Sea.

It is all part of the 250 miles of unspoiled coastline whose inlets, coves, and huddled bays make up the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, one of three national parks that cover Wales’s most scenic landscape and the only one in Britain to include its balmy coast­line. Its 182 miles of marked serpentine footpaths provide excellent walks in the com­pany of wildflowers and seabirds.

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