Plas Bodegroes – Pwllheli, North Wales, Wales

Plas Bodegroes – Pwllheli, North Wales, Wales

The Land’s End of Wales and a Food Lover’s Mecca At a time when Wales was the last place to come to mind as a gastronomic destination, Plas Bodegroes (Rosehips Hall) arrived in the mid-1980s and changed all that. The handsome Georgian manor house is located on the west coast’s Lleyn Peninsula, in a spot whose quiet is broken by little besides bird­song. The emphasis here falls firmly on the cuisine. Innovative, exciting, accomplished, using top-quality local ingredients without pretension, the kitchen never ceases to impress. In fact, it is arguably the best place to eat in the country. The enjoyment of a few days in this stylish, informal 18th-century manor house, overseen with friendly ease by owner and hostess Gunna Chown—her husband, Chris, reigns in the kitchen—is enhanced by its location on the wild and classically Welsh 24-mile-long outcrop of rock and green pastures, the Land’s End of Wales. Parts of the untamed Lleyn Peninsula were without electricity until the late 1960s, and Welsh is still widely spoken in the area. Clifftop walks, birding, and exploring sleepy coastal towns that preserve the old ways fill serene, regen­erating days that culminate with another brilliant dinner back at Plas Bodegroes in this little-known stronghold of Welsh culture.

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The Land’s End of Wales and a Food Lover’s Mecca

At a time when Wales was the last place to come to mind as a gastronomic destination, Plas Bodegroes (Rosehips Hall) arrived in the mid-1980s and changed all that. The handsome Georgian manor house is located on the west coast’s Lleyn Peninsula, in a spot whose quiet is broken by little besides bird­song.

The emphasis here falls firmly on the cuisine. Innovative, exciting, accomplished, using top-quality local ingredients without pretension, the kitchen never ceases to impress. In fact, it is arguably the best place to eat in the country. The enjoyment of a few days in this stylish, informal 18th-century manor house, overseen with friendly ease by owner and hostess Gunna Chown—her husband, Chris, reigns in the kitchen—is enhanced by its location on the wild and classically Welsh 24-mile-long outcrop of rock and green pastures, the Land’s End of Wales.

Parts of the untamed Lleyn Peninsula were without electricity until the late 1960s, and Welsh is still widely spoken in the area. Clifftop walks, birding, and exploring sleepy coastal towns that preserve the old ways fill serene, regen­erating days that culminate with another brilliant dinner back at Plas Bodegroes in this little-known stronghold of Welsh culture.

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