Chomolhari Trek and the Tiger’s Nest – Paro Valley, Bhutan

Untrammeled Terrain at a Sacred Mountain

The last independent Buddhist mountain kingdom in the Himalayas, Bhutan (Druk Yul, the Land of the Thunder Dragon) is one of the most remote and tantalizing corners of Asia. Seventy percent of its 18,000 square miles is forested, and the nation treats nature with admirable respect – its king is young and environmentally sensitive, and many of the country’s higher regions remain nearly free of the footprints of man, untouched examples of the fast-disappearing Himalayan environment.

The nine-day trek to Chomolhari, Bhutan’s sacred and highest mountain, at the border with Tibet, offers outsiders a rare opportunity to experience its unspoiled mountain wilder­ness and varied terrain, not to mention its almost complete lack of other trekkers (Bhutan heavily restricts tourism). Climbing beside ter­raced farms and verdant rice paddies, through meadows and low forests, travelers venture beyond the tree line into a world of glaciers and rock, where the legendary snow leopard prowls. Campsites are set up in high alpine pastures where yak herders bring their shaggy animals to graze by pristine mountain lakes.

Clinging to a sheer mountain ledge about 3,000 feet above the terraced Paro Valley, Taktsang, the Tiger’s Nest, is a destination of treks long and short, and of reverent Buddhist pilgrims. The greatest of all Bhutanese monu­ments, it was founded in A.D. 747 by a Tibetan missionary venerated as the second Buddha and called Guru Rinpoche (Precious Teacher). Legend says he landed on this spot from neigh­boring Tibet astride a flying tiger, bringing the tenets of Buddhism with him. It’s startlingly scenic, with nothing breaking the silence except a waterfall, the call of a raven, the flut­tering of the prayer flags, and the chanting of a few monks.

The stone monastery suffered from a major fire in 1998, but it is slowly being restored.

  • a couple of years ago
  • Bhutan
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