Month: October 2017

fairmont-ajman

Fairmont Ajman

For a short break on your doorstep that’s as cultural as it is relaxing, this delightful property is sure to impress

SEAFARING HERITAGE

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In a gorgeous reflection of the fishing heritage of Ajman, this hotel boasts stunning marine-inspired interiors – the pinnacle of which can be seen in a feature sculpture situated in Azrak. Commanding centre stage in the hotel’s lobby lounge cafe, this beautiful glass art sculpture created by Lasvit is dramatically suspended from the ceiling. Measuring 16m in diameter, it portrays a spiralling shoal of fish about to be captured in basket-like nets and represents a gratitude for the sea -something that remains at the heart of Ajman culture.

 BESPOKE SHISHA

Elevate your shisha experience at Badr Lounge. Sit back and enjoy stunning panoramic sea views as you take your pick from 16 distinctive blends. Inspired by the Arabic word for moon, Badr Lounge offers a relaxed garden-style setting and is home to a talented shisha mixologist who’s only too happy to create personalised flavours from his cart stocked with countless jars of different blends.

He’ll give you an introduction to shisha blending, detailing the subtleties of the preparation process and giving tips on what mixes work best.

 ROOM WITH A VIEW

Offering unrivalled and panoramic views of the Arabian Gulf flanked by an emerging city skyline, the two exclusive Penthouse suites are the cream of the Fairmont crop. Expect 5oosqm of beautifully designed double-storey space with floor-to-ceiling windows to make the most of the spectacular views. Perfect for the whole family, you’ll have three bedrooms as standard with the option to connect to a fourth if required. With a separate living area, dining room, kitchen, bar and entertainment space, you’ll also love the spacious spa-inspired marble bathroom with its dual rain shower experience, oversized soaking tub and bath amenities from Le Labo.

TROPICAL VIBE

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Inspired and built from recyclable materials salvaged from the sea, Driftwood is a uniquely rustic beach bar nestled on the edge of the beautiful shoreline. It’s become one of Ajman’s most popular hangouts, and it’s easy to see why. Offering an authentic Caribbean experience, relax barefoot with your toes in the sand, sipping on a cold beverage and listening to reggae music as you drink in spectacular sunsets. For seafood lovers, this place is a culinary delight thanks to its locally-sourced seafood, which is grilled to perfection on the BBQ by the talented in-house chefs.

FOR AN ART LOVER

Get ready to indulge your cultural side thanks to the inspiring line-up of exhibitions taking place throughout the year. Having already showcased Dream by Ukrainian artist Yelyzaveta Starostina and a Ramadan exhibit by Emirati artist Budour Al Ali, there are exciting plans for further showcases in the works – perfect for combining a love for travel and art.

The Meydan Hotel

The Meydan Hotel

Sweeping and iconic, this stunning property makes for a staycation with a difference

 CREAM OF THE CROP

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Indulge in the very best by booking a stay in the Presidential Suite. Arranged over two levels and offering beautifully designed space, there’s room for the whole family in this two-bedroom suite, from which you can enjoy outstanding views of the majestic Meydan Racecourse. If you’re looking for a suite with Dubai skyline and Burj Khalifa views to enjoy with your family, the Presidential Meydan Suite is the ideal choice.

A SENSE OF CALM

Relax and unwind with a visit to the infinity pool on the 11th floor which boasts outstanding Meydan Racecourse vistas. Kids can enjoy their very own pool and dedicated play area while fitness fans can head to the state-of- the-art gym. Enter a state of Zen in The Meydan Massage rooms – try The Meydan Signature massage, which uses both deep tissue and hot stone massage and combines oils, pressure point stimulation and hot stones to soothe away tension.

DINE IN STYLE

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With seven outlets, you can rest assured you’ll dine in style at The Meydan Hotel. Head to fine-dining steakhouse Prime, where only the best cuts of premium beef are served, and try the speciality flambe. Shiba restaurant offers authentic Asian delights prepared by talented Japanese and Chinese chefs. Or, take the family to Farriers restaurant for international culinary creations. For delicious beverages, there are many spots to choose from. Qube Sports Bar has 21 big screens so you can watch your favourite game while enjoying a snack. Or, head to Shiba Bar for its chic ambiance and extravagant Asian-inspired mixed drinks.

 HORSING AROUND

For equestrian fans, this hotel is hard to beat. Not only do rooms offer racetrack views but, from September you can take a behind-the-scenes tour of the stables, grandstand and the racecourse. The racing season starts in November with Dubai World Cup set for 31 March.

TEE OFF

There’s no need to worry about membership fees at golf course The Track, as you can simply pay as you play. With a 400-yard floodlit driving range, short game practice area and putting green, it’s perfect for those looking to hone their skills. Seasoned golfers will enjoy 7,412 yards of Black championship tees.

Bab Al Shams Desert Resort & Spa

Bab Al Shams Desert Resort & Spa

Nestled among burnt orange sand dunes under a starlit sky, this low-rise resort is the perfect place for a truly unique desert stay

 DESERT DINING

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Home to the region’s first authentic open- air desert restaurant, Al Hadheerah is the perfect air-conditioned place in which to enjoy a traditional Arabian meal surrounded by a truly magical landscape. As you dine, enjoy a thrilling horse and camel show, entertainment from belly dancers, live music and all the excitement of a traditional Tanoura dancer.

 ARABIAN ABODES

Check into any of the 115 gorgeous rooms and suites and you’re sure to be impressed. Almost an antithesis to modern hotel suites thanks to the traditional-style interiors, all the mod cons are stylishly concealed with televisions tucked inside wooden chests and cleverly disguised wiring. The use of natural stone, dark wood and regional glasswork provide a real sense of an Arabian retreat.

JOURNEYS IN THE SAND

Bab Al Shams Desert Resort & Spa-1

With the hoof prints of one of the first camels to set foot on the resort preserved in the hotel for good luck, it’s no wonder that this place offers oodles of desert activities. Set off on a majestic camel journey through the dunes or pick up the pace with a Jeep desert drive. Try your hand at falconry, archery or riding horseback through the sand. The infinity pools are nestled among these desert sands while little ones can escape the heat at the indoor Kids Club.

AWARD-WINNING STAYS

When you stay at Bab Al Shams Desert Resort & Spa you can rest assured you’re guaranteed an exceptional staycation with the resort having scooped more than 30 local, regional and international awards. From ‘Best Staycation Experience’ and ‘Best Luxury Day Spa’ to featuring in the ‘Top 100 Hotels in the World,’ it’s a winning choice that’s well worth a visit.

PAMPERING DELIGHT

Expect to be pampered at the award-winning Satori Spa where skilled therapists will transport you deep into a world of relaxation. The signature skincare programmes and massages can be tailored to suit your needs. Whether you want to relax, revitalise or detoxify, the perfect pick-me-up awaits.

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The St. Regis Abu Dhabi

Reach for the sky at this statuesque property, which elevates the holiday experience

 SUITE SUCCESS

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Entrance of St Regis Abu Dhabi

Each of the hotel’s 283 guestrooms and 55 suites boast great views of the Arabian Gulf. When only the best will do, book into the extravagant Abu Dhabi Suite – the world’s highest suspended hotel suite, which is loftily positioned 220m above ground between Nation Towers. Stretching i,i20sqm, the three-bedroom, two-storey suite has panoramic views, a spa, cinema, kitchen and gym. Simply take the private elevator and start exploring.

SOAK UP THE VIEW

Get ready for an afternoon to remember at Brunch in the Clouds, the highest Friday celebration in the country. Taking place in the Abu Dhabi Suite, it’s something extra special. Let the live band keep you entertained and order a la carte, or browse the seafood buffet, caviar ice-bar and

carvery station, saving space for dessert. Ladies can enjoy a manicure or pedicure and there are free taster massages for everyone in the in-room spa suite.

BE WAITED ON

First introduced at The St. Regis New York by John Jacob Astor IV himself, the signature St. Regis Butler Service will transform your stay into a VIP experience. Take a load off as your experienced butler will anticipate your every need, from unpacking your luggage to sending in a reviving cafetiere of hot coffee. The service is complimentary for hotel guests and is accessible at any hour via e-mail and text message.

A HIGHBROW SUPPER

Got a head for heights? Join the 20 guests who, on the second Friday of each month,  enjoy an Al fresco meal 255m in the air.

The Helipad Sunset Supper takes guests up to the rooftop helipad where a brigade of chefs, butlers, mixologists and waiters cater to your every whim. Feast on caviar, oysters and delicious canapes while taking in the breathtaking view.

PAMPERED TO PERFECTION

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Remede Spa Located At The St. Regis Abu Dhabi

Treat yourself at the beautiful Remede Spa where you can indulge in four-and-a- half hours of tip-to-toe indulgence with the St. Regis Splendour spa package. From the complexion-brightening diamond microdermabrasion to the vitamin- packed oxygen mist, a massage and lots more besides, you’ll feel like a new person.

Shangri-La Al Husn

Shangri-La Al Husn Resort & Spa

For Omani elegance and luxury redefined, it has got to be this clifftop retreat

 A PRIVATE HIDEAWAY

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Infinity Pool

Take a staycation where a sense of exclusivity prevails. Perched on a rugged clifftop with expansive views over the Gulf of Oman, the scene is set for a serene staycation. With only in-house guests permitted access, this place oozes a glamorous resort vibe with discrete service and attentive staff. Enjoy access to the private beach and infinity pool at Oman’s only private beach resort. With all guests aged 16 and over, you can rest assured that a sense of calm will ensue.

PREMIUM PERKS

As a guest at Al Husn, you can enjoy exclusive benefits during your visit that are sure to elevate the staycation experience. From daily afternoon tea on the terrace overlooking the Gulf of Oman to complimentary mini-bar packages inclusive of hops, grape and soft drinks and a fantastic sunset cocktail hour from 6-7pm every evening – get set to indulge.

PERSONALISED SERVICE

From the moment you arrive, you’ll be greeted with a warm Omani welcome. This sense of belonging continues throughout your stay with bespoke experiences created by Shangri-La specialists. Embark on an elite excursion by land or sea, and expect personalised in-room amenities. Keeping cool is a breeze with cool boxes packed with cold towels, fresh water and Evian facial cooler sprays provided for all guests, whether relaxing on the private beach or lounging in a poolside cabana.

INNOVATIVE DINING

Specility Suite Dining Room

Specility Suite Dining Room

With a strong focus on eco-responsible sourcing and sustainable dining, feast on locally-sourced ingredients across Al Husn thanks to Shangri-La’s culinary GSR programme, Rooted in Nature. Make a reservation at Sultanah where the interior of this bright and airy dining room reveals a nautical design for a sophisticated dining experience while showcasing expansive views across the shoreline of adjacent sister property Shangri-La Barr Al Jissah Resort & Spa.

Sultanah Interior

Sultanah Interior

SOCIAL ELITE

Shangri-La Al Husn is the place to see and be seen with its exclusive setting providing the perfect opportunity to mingle with the international jet set. Head to the courtyard for sunset cocktails in style – a great opportunity to socialise with like-minded holiday makers in this gorgeous Omani hideaway.

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 The Refined Taste of Beirut

Chef Darren Andow

Chef Darren Andow

Food is a unifying factor in Beirut’s make-up and with dining options as diverse as its geography and history. British transplant Chef Darren Andow shares his love for the local culinary scene

 Introduce us to the food of Beirut

Lebanese cuisine is incredibly varied in terms of its origins, with a mixture of Arabic and international flavours. There is always an abundance of fresh ingredients on the table with olive oil, lemon and garlic a common thread throughout many dishes.

Is there a specific dish that’s served on special occasions?

Ouze dish

Ouze dish

If there’s one standout dish it would be ouze (slow-braised lamb on spiced rice), which is considered to be very prestigious. There’s also meghle, a sweet that is offered to well wishers at baby showers; and maamoul, a traditional date or nut-stuffed semolina dough sweet eaten at Eid and festive breaks.

What’s the most popular local dish?

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The Classic trio for Mezze

The classic mezze trio of tabboule, kebbe and hummus is always popular and Beirutis take immense pride in preparing their own versions. In fact, they are extremely competitive when it comes to debating whose is best. There are also different types of kebbe, including vegetarian, and recipes vary from village to village.

Are there any customs visitors should know about?

Eating is a serious social activity in Beirut and throughout Lebanon. People socialise around food, linger over meals and love to eat late.

Tell us a little about the general culture of eating in Beirut?

Meal times are all about sharing and whether it’s lunch or dinner there’s always a full spread. Seasonality is also very important, and you always find plenty of seasonal fruits and vegetables at the table.

What’s a must-try local dish?

The shawarma sandwiches. A street food staple, it’s also a regular main course fixture in local restaurants, and is so popular in fact that we included it in our Gordon’s Cafe menu.

 DON’T MISS

  • Where should visitors go for a special meal?
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Em Sherif Restaurant in Beirut

Burgundy on bustling Gouraud Street is one of Beirut’s, if not Lebanon’s, best restaurants. The historic French influence is still strong when it comes to dining and Burgundy’s contemporary approach with an international twist also plays on seasonal ingredients. I also highly recommend Em Sherif in Ashrafieh, a traditional and homely restaurant that is authentic in every way.

  • Best place for a quick bite?

A quick bite in the city means street food so falafel sandwiches and lahm bi ajin, which is a Lebanese take on pizza, are very popular. Barbar in Sanayeh and Bedo in Bourj Hammoud are good spots. Head to Abou Joseph in Sin el Fil or Bouboufe in Achrafieh for some of the best shawarma sandwiches.

  • Best family-friendly eatery?

Almost all of Beirut’s restaurants are family friendly but for a combination of great food and fun, take a quick trip to the Tawlet Biomass farm outside the city, where you’ll find authentic food made from organic locally grown produce.

Discover A Summer Getaway To The Spanish Island Of Menorca

Our family trip to Menorca should have been remembered as any number of things: the summer vacation when my daughter learned to snorkel, that time my dad ate a lobster’s face, the week of 17 impossibly per feet beaches. And it was all that, but halfway through our stay it also became the time my wife found out her mother was dying. We had rented a house along the Spanish island’s southern coast, in a community called Binibequer. It sounds like Binny Baker when people say it. We had a running joke about Binny Baker, whom we imagined as a legendary British comedian and predecessor to Benny Hill who’d retired to Menorca Binibequer is like an appealing Mediterranean version of a Florida enclave, with white cement and plaster houses clustered around a town center where you can walk around and buy sunscreen and beach pails and eat mussels and drink sangria made with Sprite at the bars.

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Travel can be a trick you play on yourself. You can almost make yourself believe you actually live in another place. It’s effective. In just a few days, the memory of our real lives can be obliterated. Rituals help with that. On Menorca, we got our morning coffee from the bakery by the supermarket. We went to the beach around nine. This was our favourite local cheese, that was our favourite walk. But when texts with the news of Danielle’s mother began arriving at 3 or 4 am., it yanked us out of that fantasy. Suddenly we were just strangers in a place far from home.

It was a warm night, and Danielle must have been up checking her phone. She often can’t sleep. She has the metabolism of acute, extremely aware fox watching a ping-pong match, and she gets more things done between midnight and 5 am (if you count booking babysitters and panicking about global warming as getting things done) than I do all day long. On this night, for some reason I woke up, too. Disturbance in the Force or what have you.

“My mom had a stroke,” Danielle announced, sitting up in bed. She’d gotten a text from one sister first. That sister was prone to drama, though. My mother-in-law had had many strokes, all of them minor. But then a text came in from another sister. And then from my brother-in-law, kind of a gray-haired father figure who can always be counted on when a cooler head is needed to prevail. He said it was possible Danielle’s mother had only a short time to live. So the news was sanctioned. Danielle was funny about it. She was crying but also mordant. She said something about how her mother was probably telling a paramedic he didn’t know how to drive the roads near her house and was going the wrong way.

As daybreak arrived, the sky became a deep blue, and the wind picked up. The gusts were so strong in the mornings that they sometimes knocked over bottles of shampoo in the bathroom. Standing outside on the patio in that wind, we agreed that Danielle would fly home as soon as possible. I, along with our two kids and my parents, who were with us on the trip, would keep our return tickets and fly back in a few days. Soon Danielle was on the phone calling the airline. I tried to help but mostly just got in the way.

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Upon our arrival in Menorca, we picked up a large car we had reserved. It was some kind of Renault, called a Mavis Gallant, I think. (Disclaimer: its real name wasn’t Mavis Gallant.) It was long and wide, and had enough trunk space to put another Renault inside of it. It was like a car designed by M. C. Escher. On our second morning, we packed into the Mavis Gallant to go to the beach. Danielle and I were in the front, while the children (Finn, boy, age five; Frankie, girl, age seven) sat about 10 miles away from us in the backseat, where they looked like shrunken businessmen in a limousine. My parents rented the same Renault Mavis Gallant, naturally. Gordon and Jill, ages 74 and 72 at the time of this vacation, are the happiest people I know, though they’ve been through some terrible hardships. Also, my dad is the slowest driver in the entire world. The vacation was mostly me pulling over on the side of the highway that runs across Menorca, through a miniature mountain range and bleach-blond farmland, waiting for him. He trailed me as we headed west out of Binny Baker.

Here’s the deal with Menorca: it’s the most laid-back and family-friendly of Spain’s Balearic Islands. While there are sophisticated restaurants and places to stay (including a boutique vineyard hotel called Torralbenc, where they administer some top-notch massages, as I can personally attest), the island is emphatically low-key. It doesn’t have the hordes of British and German vacationers who make neighboring Mallorca so, at times, not-fun. Also absent are the untz-untz nightclubs—and dudes sitting on the beach in $400 flip-flops scrolling through Instagram—that plague Ibiza. What you have instead on Menorca are rocks, Spaniards, and a ton of great beaches.

Menorca’s beaches come in a full spectrum. There are tiny coves notched into the coastline everywhere, for furtive couples and nudists. There is Son Bou beach, perfectly long and wide and sandy. There’s the rugged and beautiful Gala Pregonda, which you hike to over a series of hills, each spot beckoning you to the next, just in case it’s even prettier and less crowded (and it almost always is). Three of Menorca’s most famous beaches are clustered along the southwestern coast: Cala Macarella, Son Saura, and Cala en Turqueta. They’re sort of Menorca’s analogue to the Eiffel Tower or Times Square—touristic imperatives. Places you have to visit because otherwise you wouldn’t feel like you’ve really been to Menorca.

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As you drive to those beaches in your Renault MG, at some point you’ll come to large, mysterious electronic signs. You might guess that they have been placed in the peaceful, sun-beaten farmland to give people gate information for some cosmic portal. Stand next to this cow at 4:30 and you’ll be sucked into another dimension! But in fact they are something stranger: parking information signs. The prime beaches, in the height of the season (your late Julys through your ends of August), are so ungodly popular that a system was set up to start turning’ people away miles from the actual beaches.

We slowed the Mavis Gallant as we approached a sign for Cala Macarella parking. Next to it there was a lady sitting in the shade of a small tent. She explained that the lot was full. And suggested we eat lunch. In a few hours people would leave and we could come back. She helped me navigate a 14-point turn in the Renault. My father still hadn’t caught up. We decided to have lunch in Es Migjorn Gran, an inland town that is set into the side of a mountainette and has a beautiful, centuries-old center. At Bar Peri—a dark, quiet tapas spot seemingly not updated since the 1940s—we ordered typical small plates. Finn didn’t eat a single bite of nutritious food.

But he wanted dessert. “If you eat your tortilla,” I said, “you can have dessert. But if you don’t, you can’t.” Danielle looked at me: Don’t draw lines in the sand you don’t intend to back up. I glared back: Can you stop judging my parenting? “Okay, how about just three bites,” I said. “But I won’t negotiate anymore.” Daniele rolled her eyes. Looking at Finn, I could tell a whine was coming. There was a Spanish family with beautifully behaved children at the next table. My father was having just the friendliest conversation with them, even though he speaks no Spanish. He can do that Finn’s whine was getting’ louder and attracting attention. I was desperate. “Okay, just one bite…half a bite…forget it—just go pick some ice cream out of the freezer!”

Danielle was yelling at me without saying anything. That she was right made me angrier.  There was a freezer near the bar stuffed with the kinds of factory-made, highly processed ice cream products people back home in Brooklyn are statutorily prohibited from giving their kids. Finn stood looking at the colourful packages. There were so many. Frankie was already eating an ice-cream cone, watching amusedly. “I can’t decide,” Finn said. He said it like it was an accusation—how could you take me to this place with all these kinds of ice cream? “Just get the one that Frankie has,” I begged. Jill joined in: “Ooooh, that one looks delicious!” We all knew what was coming. I tried getting’ philosophical: “Your indecision is so legitimate. Disappointment is inevitable.” I shot a quick glance at my wife, who wasn’t even trying to interfere: Let me handle this. When I finally got him to pick one, unwrapped it for him, and he tasted it, he dropped it on the ground and screamed, “I want what Frankie has!!!!” So I went over to buy him that one. It didn’t work.

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Menorca’s beaches are famous for a reason, and Cala Macarella is arguably the most spectacular of them all. It’s a turquoise inlet surrounded by cliffs and rocks and pine forest, tipped with a gentle slope of white sand. Spaniards were gathered on the beach and in the shallows. Topless women, babies, young couples rolling cigarettes. With the cliff walls it felt a bit like an amphitheater—all of us sitting on the sand to watch the sea perform.

I went for a swim. The water was perfect: blue-green, just cool enough to be refreshing. It was easy to get out far enough to feel that I was alone, the other people reduced to visual details, like little wildflowers in a field. In no time I’d swum around a bend and into another cove, a smaller version of Macarella called Macarelleta. The same deal—people on the sand staring out at the seal floated on my back, and for a minute I let go of all dissatisfaction. It added one year to my life. After I returned, we got the kids ready to leave. I was silently levying a protest against my wife. She responded with a wordless counter protest. But we dried and dressed the kids and desanded the clothes and walked back through the forest to the car in a kind of practiced synchronicity.

On the path to the parking lot, the sun was burning the carpet of pine needles at a slow roast, releasing a beautiful, dry smell. Roads on Menorca don’t always make accommodations to modem traffic. There are a lot of farm roads, lined by stone walls that push in from the sides. Two cars can just squeeze past each other. Usually. When a car approaches, you both keep slowing down and slowing down until you’re creeping past each other with minimal tolerance, pulling your mirrors in, sometimes passing close enough to reach out and change the other car’s radio station. And on the way home I found myself in such a bottleneck.

I slowed. The oncoming’ car slowed. My father crept steadily behind me, liking the pace, probably not even realizing that I was slowing down. As he penned me in from behind, the oncoming car penned me in from the front, pushing us together to a point where it was unclear how to disentangle all our Mavis Gallants. It was, I thought, kind of like the impasse that I’d come to with Danielle. Not so much a fight as both of us inching forward and not backing down, and neither of us knowing how to get out of it.

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One of the things that makes Menorca the most authentic Balearic island, in my opinion, is that all of its towns feel real. Not BS tourist towns made up of hotels and little dry wall grocery stores but the kind of towns you’d expect to find on some hilltop in Castile—old and formidable, with heavy stone buildings and narrow streets and old ladies sitting on benches mumbling to each other. During the day, when everyone is indoors, hiding from the sun, these towns—especially those in the interior— can take on the air of a lost civilization, but at night they come alive.

Here on Menorca, you are constantly reminded that there’s a reason why the Spanish eat and socialize so late: because it’s f***ing hot during the day. The sun comes at you at an unpleasant volume, with retina-searing intensity. (One time Finn had to go out into an unshaded plaza to chase down his soccer ball in the middle of the day, and I half expected him to start smoking and burst into flames.) But at night? At night it’s civilized. Temperatures drop, and the wind courses over the island, whipping Menor cans’ towels and underpants as they dry on their clotheslines. During the summer, each Menorcan town has its own day of the week to host night markets— one evening it’s in Fornells, another in Ferreries, another in Alaior. On those nights, the bars and restaurants drag tables into the street, some kind of Spanish marching band or reggae five-piece is booked for a stage in the central plaza, and vendors sell bracelets and cookies and fresh fruit juices.

On Alaior’s designated night, we drove to its outskirts and ditched the Renault in a lot. With Gordon and Jill in tow, we hoofed it into the town center, toward the sounds of Spanish people having fun. Once we were there, it wasn’t long before my daughter discovered a hand-built merry-go-round setup in the middle of a lane. You paid your money and picked a “horse,” constructed out of old tires and scrap metal and broom handles. Then the man put the music on. He powered the contraption using a bicycle whose back wheel was connected to a gear, propelling the riders around in circles. I held Danielle’s hand as we watched the guy pedal (he basically had to complete a stage of the Tour de France over the course of the evening). We were suddenly not mad anymore. That was it. We didn’t talk our way through it. We just left it behind and moved on. When I was young and foolish, I wouldn’t have thought that was how you worked things out.

After lunch, we drove to the lighthouse. When we arrived, Jill went to the information kiosk (she’s interested in things; I’m not) while my dad sat down and soaked it all in from a restful position, as is his wont. Danielle was on the phone with her sisters. I took the kids out to a cave. Menorca is pocked with caves—in cliffs and underwater. Caves into which ancient contemplators disappeared, where Jews were imprisoned, treasures hidden. Caves that now host expensive cocktail lounges, like the famous Cova d’en Xoroi. Near the lighthouse, a hundred yards from the cliff’s edge, there is a cave entrance. Just a hole in the ground. And into that hole we saw people disappearing one at a time.

puerto de mahon, menorca

As soon as it was our turn, Frankie wriggled right down the ladder and disappeared into the blackness. But Finn was frightened. He stared into the hole. Finn at age five was such a force of nature, approaching the world with such defiance, that it surprised me when he got scared and grabbed onto my thumb with his soft little hand. He looked at me and said, “I want to go, but I also don’t want to go. Should I be scared?” The main psychological questions laid bare, without any of the repression we learn later in life. “I would be, probably,” I said. “But it’s not actually going to be scary when you’re down there.”

Finn eventually proceeded, solemnly, into the blackness. Frankie was waiting for us, and she took one of my hands while Finn took the other. We walked down a long underground passageway until we came to an opening, protected by a metal grate, overlooking the sea at a terrifying height. The three of us gazed out, kind of willing ourselves to bear witness. I like to think Frankie and Finn shared my sense of staring into an unknown—just as their grandmother was doing back home in America Turning’ toward the exit, Finn said he wanted an ice cream cone. I told him to ask his mom.

Armenia: A Land Soaked In History And Culture

At half past 11, three silhouettes left a hotel and walked on to the dark pavement outside. The trio was the most unlikely to be caught together on a lazy night in a small city like Goris: a middle-aged tourist guide, a 60-somethingformer rock musician, and an Indian traveller in her late 20s. The winter was long gone, its remnants had lingered in the air like the after effects of deep slumber. The dark, desolate neighbourhood had spilled on to the sidewalk. A few low beam tubelights made incongruous puddles to illuminate the ground, and the only movement on the long empty stretch ahead were the flickering human shadows.

I’d regretted the moment we stepped out; it had been a long day already and we had just arrived from Yerevan, the country’s capital. My guide Sirarpi Baghdasaryan had taken up the task of finding me the city centre (my travel fetish in every European city), and for bridging the language barrier between Vasgen Manukyan and me. Vasgen, a former guitarist and astronomy enthusiast had stood with me at Zorats Karer (the Armenian Stonehenge) earlier and admired the work of ancient stargazers who had planted 233 rocks on a large barren land to plot time.

Armenia-City

We had only met in the morning, and there was still that awkwardness we had to get rid of. For Vasgen, discussing the origin of language was seemingly the only way to bring the barrier down. “The root of some Sanskrit words,” he began, “is in Armenian.” I listened intently, partly unsatisfied with the proposal, just like anyone who’d been taught to pride the superiority of Sanskrit over other languages, would. But who was I to contest.

I was travelling through one of the oldest civilisations of the world; the city of Yerevan was built 2,796 years ago, long before Armenia accepted Christianity in AD 204. I registered some of the 10 words with same meanings—das for ten, hazar for thousand, and so on. Half past midnight, it took more than Sanskrit to perk our minds, and the conversation wielded off to Mahabharata. Even on the snoozy sleep-deprived walk, I realised how much he knew about Indian epics and how much I didn’t. Somewhere down, as the road turned, we lost our focus to some bizarre conical shaped mountain tops that were peeking in shades of grey from behind the tall buildings in the vicinity.

Maybe the world had conspired to help us, as Paulo Coelho would say: Two men in sturdy black leather jackets appeared at the comer of a block, sitting nonchalantly, as if it were not the dead of the night. Back in Delhi, this is when I would sprint in the opposite direction, but Sirarpi walked straight up to ask what it was that we were seeing—“Zangezur!” they stood up and offered to show the way. Wait, were you not supposed to refuse help from two strangers? My building anxiety was palpable, but shortly after, one of them broke into an Armenian poem he penned. It was too dark to fathom his expressions, but not dark enough to deny the emotion in his voice. About 20 lines down, when he finished, Sirarpi explained, “It’s a poem about how his mother has raised him against all odds and how greatful to God he is.” I was astonished at how easily a man could reveal his vulnerable side to people he had just met; Armenia, on the other hand was only beginning to unfold.

armenia

Travel is always a quest to personal discovery and on your way back, if you haven’t found that one hook that gives meaning to the journey. Every effort that you’ve made to get there, has been in vain. Armenia, I learned, is reflected by its people. Next morning, I met Kolya Torosyan, a famous, 89-year-old traditional duduk-maker. Duduks are the national musical instrument in Armenia—they look roughly like flutes and sound like what can be called the hybrid of a shehnai and a bagpiper. Kolyalives in Byurakan and his life is a city dweller’s enviable retirement plan. He grows tomatoes, beetroot, and walnut in his backyard, nurtures bee hives for honey, and has a loving wife of 91 whom he still considers most beautiful.

With an extraordinary’ family of four children, 12 grandchildren, and 11 great grandchildren, he has something to look forward to everyday. Upright in his brown jacket, he put long steps to navigate the long grass growing in his tiny farm to bring me to his workshop. “I’ve been in the business for 37 years,” he stated, “And we make 20 different kinds of instruments.” Like music, lifestyle, and everything else, his instruments have undergone a major transformation in the five generations that the art inhabited in the family. I asked him to play a duduk, and immediately, he plunged into his collection to bring out a very old one, saying, “People come to me and ask if I can play.

I say, ‘yes, but not well enough to make a bride get up and dance!’” While we fidgeted with his instruments down at the workshop, his wife had taken to the kitchen upstairs to ornament the table with lavaash (Armenian bread), homemade cheese and honey, and herbs plucked from the garden. It reminded me of home and how things weren’t any different when guests arrived—you’d always send them back with a full stomach. Kolya was the last in his generation to make duduks. The modern world had claimed his children for an urban profession.

If anything, Yerevan is a city wrapped in layers. On the surface, you’d compare it to any modern European counterpart: a young demographic, cosmopolitan, and if you’ve arrived late in May when the summer holidays have hit the schools, you’d find the streets booming with teenagers, happy that their three-month vacation has begun. The Mayor of the city had only recently revised the holiday schedule. He is known to have said, “What’s the point in a holiday when kids can’t enjoy summer?” The deeper you travel though, the more complex it gets in character. I met Armine Tshagharyan over coffee, a news anchor with a local TV channel who had come to give me a young perspective of Yerevan. “In Armenia, people do not worship movie stars,” she said. “Yon could be someone famous and walking the street and no one would be bothered. But things can be quite different if you are a war hero.”

armenia

Armenia is a Catholic country and had experienced the great Genocide along with the rest of Soviet Union between 1915 and 1917. Over two million Christian Armenians were exterminated by the Ottoman Empire, or modern-day Turkey. Surrounded still by hostile Islamic neighbours— Turkey, Iran, and Azerbaijan—who have nibbled into the former Kingdom of Armenia to expand borders over time, Armenia has held its own through the intense nationalism among citizens. There is still constant friction with the Azerbaijani border, and a few days before I arrived, soldiers had returned from war.

As we strolled down Say at- Nova Avenue, Armine froze temporarily, her eyes followed the gaze of a young man’s and she blushed. She stopped for a conversation and hugged him. After he left, she turned and with abroad smile and explained, “You know who that is? He is our hero. He went into the Azerbaijan bunker and single-handedly destroyed it. He’s only 22!” At night, we had gone for the Aurora Prize ceremony—the annual event organised by the Aurora Humanitarian Initiative on behalf of the descendants of the Armenian Genocide survivors. The initiative collects US$1 million to help one individual engaged in humanitarian efforts to further their work. This year, the prize went to Marguerite Barankitse from Maison Shalom and REMA Hospital, who cared for orphans and refugees during the civil war in Burundi.

In Armenia, all men must serve the army for two years after high school. Andranik Ugujyan, a 23-year-old student pursuing botanical archeology, remembers his intense training. I first saw him with his fingers dug into the soil at the Areni-1 Cave Complex, the excavated archeological site that reported the oldest winery in the world (the Early Bronze Age). Andranik had later met me in Yerevan. “Everybody in Armenia has a history of Genocide,” he said. It’s a reality one must live with. Andranik had to live with his dark past, one where his grandparents were tortured and had to flee Armenia for survival. “But the truth is, that although we will never forget what happened, we want to move forward.” We were sitting on the roof of a dark, abandoned, half-constructed building at 3 am when life had penetrated darkness with profundity. “This maybe it,” I thought, “the hook”… The promise of summer, the promise of light, and man’s innate ability to look beyond adversities.

Nellore: An Eco-Tourism Hub

From white sandy beaches to freshwater lakes to small islands, Nellore district plays home to multiple water bodies and has pioneered eco-tourism in the state.

DO

► Visit the missile launch pad of Sriharikota and combine it with a visit to the famous lagoon of Pulicat that serves as a magnet for various birds that flock here from as far as Siberia.

► Fish, sail, or just sunbathe on the long stretch of clean and beautiful beaches of Nellore. Add Tupilipalem beach to the top of your list.

Hotel Yesh Park

Hotel Yesh Park

STAY

► Hotel Yesh Park is centrally-located with all basic amenities and comfortable rooms.

The second largest brackish lake in India, Pulicat, is a blessing for serious birdwatchers. Birds tike Flamingo, Pelicans, Grey Herons, and crocodiles crowd the sanctuary. One can go for bird safari tours, camp by the lake side, or engage in water sports.

Vizag: A Beachside Metropolis Experiencing A Food Revolution

One of India’s oldest harbour towns replete with calm beaches is today an IT hub and home to leading restaurants serving international as well as coastal Andhra fares.

DO

► Satisfy your curiosity of being in a Russian submarine by visiting the Submarine Museum of Vizag.

Vizag

► A three-hour drive from the city, the coffee plantations of Araku Valley will leave you spellbound with its picturesque scenery.

STAY

► Four Points by Sheraton Vizag offers warm hospitality and great South Indian cuisine.

► Opt for a sea-facing executive suite at The Gateway Hotel Beach Road Visakhapatnam.